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Author Topic: Buss wire, grounding, powdercoating  (Read 1011 times)

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Offline wylymon

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Buss wire, grounding, powdercoating
« on: July 13, 2011, 10:13:27 am »
A couple of general questions on grounding.
 1. The buss wire in the kits consists of an uncoated solid core wire that looks like aluminum. Would a
     solid core copper, teflon coated wire of 18 gauge work better?  What is the rationale for an
     uncoated buss wire.....other than cost?  I am using Klipschorns so I am seeking absolute lowest
     possible noise.
 2. I have powder coated my two Paramount and sex top plates on both sides. The coater did a 
     great job but the coating is thick. Any ideas for doing a neat looking ground for the terminal
     strips? ........or would it be wise to run a single grounding wire to all the terminal strips to the
     grounding lug?

     Thanks

     James Wyly     
James Wyly

Offline Lee Hankins

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Re: Buss wire, grounding, powdercoating
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2011, 11:04:38 am »
James the buss wire is uninsulated tin or silver coated solid copper, no reason to use an insulated wire in this application.

Since you had the top plates coated on both sides you will need to remove the powder coating on the underside where the terminal strips are attached to the top plate.  A metal to metal contact is always required when grounding a part or component, and using star washers helps to cut into the plate for better contact.  A grounding wire to all terminal strips connected to the grounding lug (paint removed from top plate) would accomplish the same results.  This might or might not pick up some hum.

Hope this answers your questions.

Cordially,
Lee Hankins
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Offline Grainger49

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Re: Buss wire, grounding, powdercoating
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2011, 11:25:22 am »
James,

I'm with Lee on this.  The powder coating is a strong insulator.  I would use a wire brush on a Dremel tool to remove it around the terminal strip mounting holes. 
Grainger Morrison, Audio Salesman 1966-1976

VPI HW-19/Souther Tri-Quartz (Grado Sonata-1)/Eros/FP-2/Paramours (1) with MQ Iron (upgrades to all), Blumenstein Orca/Dungeness Speakers - PS Audio Regenerator

Offline wylymon

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Re: Buss wire, grounding, powdercoating
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2011, 04:53:40 pm »
Went out and bought a dremel......what a cool tool........learning curve is about 5 minutes.....just hold it like a pencil and hold on tight....sucker generates some torque. took about 15 minutes to do all the ground holes on 3 plates! All were perfect circles except the first one....and it can't be seen after the screw and washer were installed. Thanks for your help.  James
James Wyly

Offline Grainger49

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Re: Buss wire, grounding, powdercoating
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2011, 03:57:42 am »
It has always been my guess that the front and rear plates on Martin-Logan speakers were powder coated.  That is why I believe it to be a good insulator.

James, all hobbyists should have a Dremel.  It is just too much fun.  I used mine with some Semi-chrome polish to polish the brass end bells on my M-Q outputs for my Paramours (then lacquered them).

My Dremel has about 5 speed settings but it only goes FAST and VERY FAST!
Grainger Morrison, Audio Salesman 1966-1976

VPI HW-19/Souther Tri-Quartz (Grado Sonata-1)/Eros/FP-2/Paramours (1) with MQ Iron (upgrades to all), Blumenstein Orca/Dungeness Speakers - PS Audio Regenerator

Offline HF9

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Re: Buss wire, grounding, powdercoating
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2011, 10:44:29 am »
I've personally had bad luck with the newer Dremels, the last one burnt out on me after a few months of light use (was used maybe 4-5 times). I think my dad had his old one for decades, so there's presumably a difference in build quality between the old and new models. I now use a Black & Decker version that was half the price and has lasted much longer. It seems like most of the attachments made for the Dremel fit on it.

I agree that they're a blast to use. I've got a nice set of sanding and de-burring bits and the metal cutting discs are incredibly handy.
My DIY Audio Electronics Blog: DIYAudioBlog.com